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  • Posted February 7, 2020

U.S. Cities With the Worst Speeding Problem

https://fox26medford.com/u-s-cities-with-the-worst-speeding-problem

by 360 Quote | January 30, 2020 3:15 pm

Data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that despite the risks, approximately 70 percent of American drivers report speeding at least some of the time. Each year, speeding kills about 10,000 people and is responsible for nearly 30 percent of all motor vehicle deaths in the U.S.

Fortunately, since 2005, the speeding-related fatal accident rate has decreased nationwide by about 34 percent, from 4.2 to 2.7 per 100,000 people in 2017. While speeding-related deaths among adult drivers declined slightly during that time, those among teenagers fell dramatically. Between 2005 and 2017, the number of speeding-related fatalities per 100,000 teenagers dropped from 13.2 to 5.8—results that experts partially attribute to increased seatbelt use and decreased drinking and driving. The CDC reports that since 2005, the proportion of teens who reported not wearing a seatbelt was cut in half. Similarly, the share of teens who reported riding with a drunk driver fell by 42 percent.

Despite improvements to the speeding fatality rate at the national level, there is significant regional variation. To determine which cities suffer the most from speeding-related fatalities, researchers at Compare Auto Insurance analyzed data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System for the period 2013-2017. They found that speeding tends to account for a higher percentage of traffic fatalities in the Southeast and Midwest. Additionally, four of the worst 15 cities for speeding are located in California.

These are the cities with the worst speeding problem.

The 15 Cities With the Worst Speeding Problem


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

15. Charlotte, North Carolina

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 40.6%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 3.8 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 159

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 392


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

14. Stockton, California

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 40.7%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 3.6 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 55

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 135


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

13. Chula Vista, California

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 41.7%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 1.9 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 25

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 60


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

12. Yonkers, New York

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 42.1%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 1.6 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 16

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 38


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

11. Fresno, California

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 42.6%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 2.8 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 72

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 169


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

10. Aurora, Colorado

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 42.9%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 2.9 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 51

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 119


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

9. Chicago, Illinois

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 43.4%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 2.0 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 278

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 640


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

8. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 47.3%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 4.4 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 131

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 277


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

7. Saint Louis, Missouri

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 48.6%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 7.7 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 121

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 249


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

6. Washington, District Of Columbia

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 49.2%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 1.8 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 61

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 124


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

5. Plano, Texas

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 49.2%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 2.2 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 31

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 63


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

4. Fontana, California

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 50.7%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 3.5 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 36

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 71


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

3. Cleveland, Ohio

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 51.9%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 4.8 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 94

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 181


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

2. Irving, Texas

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 52.2%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 4.1 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 48

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 92


Photo Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

1. North Las Vegas, Nevada

Share of all traffic fatalities involving speeding (2013-2017): 53.9%

Annual speeding-related fatality rate (2013-2017): 3.5 per 100k

Total speeding-related fatalities (2013-2017): 41

Total traffic fatalities (2013-2017): 76

Methodology & Detailed Findings

Fatality statistics were obtained from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System for the period 2013-2017. City and state population statistics were obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

The following definitions were used in categorizing accidents by location in order to simplify interpretations:

Freeway = Interstate + Non-Interstate Freeway + Expressway

Major highway = Non-Interstate Other Principal Arterial

Minor highway = Non-Interstate Minor Arterial

Primary street = Collector + Local

Fatalities per 100k residents were calculated as the sum of fatalities for 2013-2017 divided by the sum of the populations for the same years, multiplied by 100,000. Only cities with at least 200,000 residents and more than one speeding-related fatality were included in the analysis. Cities were ranked according to the percentage of all motor vehicle fatalities that had at least one vehicle speeding prior to the accident. In the event of a tie, cities with higher speeding-related fatality rates were ranked higher.

Location is not the only factor that influences the likelihood of fatal crashes due to speeding. The rate of speeding-related fatalities also differs by demographics. About 75 percent of drivers involved in speeding-related fatal accidents are male, regardless of age. According to the IIHS, men usually drive more miles than women and are also more likely to engage in other risky driving behaviors such as not using seatbelts and driving under the influence of alcohol, which all contribute to higher fatality rates.

While speeding-related fatality rates vary across cities, rural roads in general have significantly higher rates of fatalities caused by speeding when compared to urban roads. Even though rural roads only account for about 30 percent of miles traveled in the U.S., they represent about 50 percent of speeding-related fatalities. Historically, rural roads have had higher posted speed limits, which correlate to higher rates of speeding and higher fatality rates. Compared to urban roads, rural roads also have a higher incidence of rollover crashes, which can be caused by speeding. Furthermore, rural drivers might have less access to prompt medical attention after an accident, which increases the likelihood of death after injury.

Speed kills, but the recent decreases in speeding-related fatalities is promising. To equip law enforcement with the tools they need to reduce speeding on the road, the NHTSA works with local jurisdictions around the country to provide training in enforcing traffic laws. Some of the methods that law enforcement officers use to detect speeding include radar, laser devices, VASCAR, and speed cameras. Additionally, certain cities like Boston have experimented with lowering speed limits to reduce speed-related accidents. Furthermore, some automakers have installed intelligent speed assistance (ISA) systems within cars to help drivers better monitor their own speed, and some auto insurance companies offer discounts for drivers who slow down. Tackling the speeding problem will require continued efforts from individuals, industry, law enforcement, and legislators.